Paul Labadie – BFTP

Paul-labadie-dvl.bftp

Foto — DVL

PAUL
LABADIE/
BLAST FROM
THE PAST

Paul-labadie-dvl.bftp

Foto — DVL

PAUL
LABADIE/
BLAST FROM
THE PAST

Paul Labadie betreibt nicht nur seinen eigenen Griptape-Brand “Ashes”, sondern ist vor allem bekannt als Filmer von Vans Europe. So ist er u.a. verantwortlich für einige der besten europäischen Videos der letzten Zeit, wie etwa „Tom’s Tales” oder “Kingdom for a Cooler”. In der folgenden Liste gibt uns Paul einen Einblick, woher seine Inspiration kommt um derartige Meisterwerke zu produzieren. Er hätte uns gerne auch zehn Parts geschickt, allerdings wollten wir nicht direkt unsere noch so frische Rubrik sprengen. Daher sollen an dieser Stelle erst einmal fünf Stück genügen. Nachdem diese Woche erst das neue Vans Video “Alright, OK” rausgekommen ist, freut es uns umso mehr den Mann hinter diesem Video, Greg Hunt, auch in Pauls Liste wiederzufinden. Viel Spaß bei dieser Lektion in Skatevideogeschichte und wer weiß, vielleicht folgt ja irgendwann ein Teil 2 mit Paul.

Sal Barbier, H-Street’s Hokus Pokus, 1989.

It’s the first part of the first skate video I ever saw. I was on holidays with the friend who I started skateboarding with. We bought the video from a skate shop and we skated home hanging on to the back of his aunt’s car. She made TV dinner for us to watch it. The skating, the music, the style, the clothes, the filming… everything was mind blowing. Some of the rail tricks he does are super gnarly. My favourites are the 16mm shots. To this day I still get goose bumps watching it.

Greg Hunt, Stereo’s Tincan Folklore, 1996.

The whole video is just awesome. It’s super artsy but in the best possible way. Greg Hunt’s part starts with him just skating through a restaurant and I though that was the coolest thing ever. I actually went to that fast food one day, not knowing, and I started tripping once I realised it was the one from the video. It’s all filmed in San Francisco and I was obsessed with that city at the time. The part has some cool tricks but to me it’s way more about the vibe. There’s some top notch front filming in there too and the Tortoise track fits perfectly.

Donny Barley, Under Achievers, 1996.

This video had a huge impact in Europe cause it was our first proper introduction to East Coast skateboarding. Almost everything we had seen until then came from California. The first shot of this part is a real work of art. Donny Barley takes a gnarly slam and breaks his front tooth on a trash bin. Then he still does the trick. The filming is incredible. If you think Strobeck invented the face-feet-face filming then you should watch this part. Dan Wolfe is one of the best filmers ever.

Josh Kalis, AWS’s Time Code, 1997.

This is to me the best example of a short video part. Everything in it is powerful, there’s no unnecessary footage. I always try to keep that in mind when I edit: don’t use anything unless it serves a purpose. Especially in this day and age where we are over saturated with skate footage, quality over quantity should be the number one rule. The line with the switch back lip at Pier 7 is insane.

Robbie Gangemi, Zoo York’s Mixtape, 1998.

I really loved this video because it had a very unique concept (all tracks are rap freestyles from a radio show) which gave it a really strong East Coast identity. The level of skating was maybe not the craziest if you compare it to other videos of the same era but Robbie Gangemi’s part stood out because he was skating bigger stuff, fast and with great style. His last trick is a 50-50 up a pretty gnarly rail which was something I had never seen before.

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Cover-issue-44

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Cover-issue-44

IRREGULAR
SKATEBOARD
MAGAZIN ISSUE
No. 44

Hier gibt es einen Einblick

in unsere aktuelle Ausgabe

read more

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